Geek

10 iPhone tips that everyone should know [Video]

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 19:21

There are certain iOS tips that I feel everyone should be aware of and use on a regular basis. In this hands-on video, we take a brief look at 10 iPhone tips and tricks. more…

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How India's Single Time Zone Is Hurting Its People

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 19:10
"The BBC reports on the detrimental effects of all of India being in one time zone since British Colonial rule," writes Slashdot reader dryriver. From the report: India stretches 3,000km (1,864 miles) from east to west, spanning roughly 30 degrees longitude. This corresponds with a two-hour difference in mean solar times -- the passage of time based on the position of the sun in the sky. The U.S. equivalent would be New York and Utah sharing one time zone. Except that in this case, it also affects more than a billion people -- hundreds of millions of whom live in poverty. The school day starts at more or less the same time everywhere in India but children go to bed later and have reduced sleep in areas where the sun sets later. An hour's delay in sunset time reduces children's sleep by 30 minutes. Using data from the India Time Survey and the national Demographic and Health Survey, [Cornell University Economist] Maulik Jagnani found that school-going children exposed to later sunsets get fewer years of education, and are less likely to complete primary and middle school. He found evidence that suggested that sunset-induced sleep deprivation is more pronounced among the poor, especially in periods when households face severe financial constraints. "This might be because sleep environments among poor households are associated with noise, heat, mosquitoes, overcrowding, and overall uncomfortable physical conditions. The poor may lack the financial resources to invest in sleep-inducing goods like window shades, separate rooms, indoor beds and adjust their sleep schedules," he told me.

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Shlayer Malware Disables macOS Gatekeeper To Run Unsigned Payloads

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 18:30
A new variant of the multi-stage Shlayer malware known to target macOS users has been observed in the wild, now being capable to escalate privileges using a two-year-old technique and to disable the Gatekeeper protection mechanism to run unsigned second stage payloads. Bleeping Computer reports: This new Shlayer variant unearthed by Carbon Black's Threat Analysis Unit (TAU) targets all macOS releases up to the latest 10.14.3 Mojave, and will arrive on the targets' machines as a DMG, PKG, ISO, or ZIP files, some of them also signed with a valid Apple developer ID to make them look legitimate. Shlayer samples found by TAU also use malicious shell scripts to download additional payloads just like older installments did, and, in the case of samples distributed as DMG images, will surreptitiously launch a .command script in the background after the user launches the fake Flash installer. The malicious script included in the DMG is encoded using base64 and will decrypt a second AES encrypted script which will be executed automatically after being decrypted. One it successfully downloads the second stage malware payload, Shlayer will "to escalate privileges with sudo using a technique invoking /usr/libexec/security_authtrampoline," presented by Patrick Wardle in his Death by 1000 Installers talk at DEFCON 2017. The next step is to download extra payloads which all contain adware according to TAU and it makes sure they'll be able to run on the compromised Mac by disabling the Gatekeeper protection mechanism. After this is accomplished, all extra payloads downloaded and launched by Shlayer will be seen as whitelisted software because the OS will no longer check if they are signed with an Apple developer ID. Also, just in case the malware is not able to disable Gatekeeper on the infected Mac, some of the second stage payloads are also signed with valid developer IDs.

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The Stolen Equifax Data Has Never Been Found, Experts Suspect a Spy Scheme

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:50
An anonymous reader quotes a report from CNBC: On September 7, 2017, the world heard an alarming announcement from credit ratings giant Equifax: In a brazen cyber-attack, somebody had stolen sensitive personal information from more than 140 million people, nearly half the population of the U.S. It was the consumer data security scandal of the decade. The information included social security numbers, driver's license numbers, information from credit disputes and other personal details. CEO Richard Smith stepped down under fire. Lawmakers changed credit freeze laws and instilled new regulatory oversight of credit ratings agencies. Then, something unusual happened. The data disappeared. Completely. CNBC talked to eight experts, including data "hunters" who scour the dark web for stolen information, senior cybersecurity managers, top executives at financial institutions, senior intelligence officials who played a part in the investigation and consultants who helped support it. All of them agreed that a breach happened, and personal information from 143 million people was stolen. But none of them knows where the data is now. It's never appeared on any hundreds of underground websites selling stolen information. Security experts haven't seen the data used for in any of the ways they'd expect in a theft like this -- not for impersonating victims, not for accessing other websites, nothing. Most experts familiar with the case now believe that the thieves were working for a foreign government, and are using the information not for financial gain, but to try and identify and recruit spies.

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$110 Beats Pill+ speaker, $40 Sony PlayStation Classic, and other tech deals

iDownloadBlog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:33

Today's roundup of tech deals from around the web includes $150 off Apple's new MacBook Air with Retina display, $110 Beats Pill+ portable speaker, Sony's PlayStation Classic Console for just $40, and much more. But you better hurry, these prices won't last long!
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Kroger continues to resist Apple Pay as it launches new ‘Kroger Pay’ platform based on QR codes

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:31

One of the larger Apple Pay holdouts, Kroger, is debuting its new mobile payment option today in Columbus and Colorado, with a nationwide rollout by the end of the year. The grocery chain continues to resist Apple Pay, instead going with a QR code-based Kroger Pay system.

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Apple says all Developer Program members must enable two-factor by the end of this month

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:10

Apple today has informed members of its Developer Program that they must enable two-factor authentication on their account by the end of this month. Apple made the announcement in an email to Developer Program members.

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Google Play Store App Rejections Up 55% From Last Year, App Suspensions Up 66%

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 17:10
In a year-in-review announcement today, Google said Play Store app rejections went up 55% last year after the OS maker tightened up its app review process. From a report: Similarly, stats for app suspensions also went up, by more than 66%, according to Google, which the company credited to its continued investment in "automated protections and human review processes that play critical roles in identifying and enforcing on bad apps." One of the most significant roles in the automated systems cited by Google in identifying malware is the Google Play Protect service, which is currently included by default with the official Play Store app. Google said this service now scans over 50 billion apps per day, and even goes as far as downloading and scanning every Android app it finds on the internet. [...] Play Store's automated systems are now getting better and better at detecting threats, so much so that Google is now seeing clear patterns. "We find that over 80% of severe policy violations are conducted by repeat offenders and abusive developer networks," Ahn said. "When malicious developers are banned, they often create new accounts or buy developer accounts on the black market in order to come back to Google Play."

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FCC Chairman Warns of 'Regulatory Intervention' as He Criticizes Carriers' Anti-Robocall Plans

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 16:29
The Federal Communications Commission will consider "regulatory intervention" if the major telecommunications carriers don't set up a system this year to stop spoofed robocalls, FCC chairman Ajit Pai said Wednesday. "It's time for carriers to implement robust caller ID authentication," Pai said in a statement, noting that some companies have already committed to carrying out protocols, known as the SHAKEN/STIR framework, in 2019. A report adds: Pai sent letters to major wireless carriers in November demanding that they adopt industry-wide frameworks to crackdown on the practice of "spoofing," where robocallers mask a call's origin with a fraudulent number on their caller ID. On Wednesday, the FCC chair followed up with another demand that they implement caller authentication systems this year and a threat over the repercussions if they don't comply. You can read responses from carriers FCC's website.

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Twitter testing new pop-up design for quickly viewing profile details on iOS

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 16:27

Twitter announced today that it is testing a new way to quickly preview profiles in its iOS app. With this change, you can now get a quick glimpse at another user’s profile without having to fully visit their account page.

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Apple invites Hollywood stars to the unveiling of a “paid” video-streaming service on March 25

iDownloadBlog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 16:14

Hollywood actresses Jennifer Aniston, Reese Witherspoon, Jennifer Garner and director JJ Abrams will reportedly be in attendance.
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Apple’s upcoming news subscription service is running into resistance from big publishers

iDownloadBlog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 16:01

apple news channels you follow

Apple apparently wants half of the revenue. Small wonder the greedy Cupertino technology powerhouse has faced a pushback from America’s biggest newspapers.
Categories: Geek

Phil Schiller spotted at Audi e-tron event in Spain

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 16:01

Apple SVP of Worldwide Marketing Phil Schiller was spotted at an Audi event in Marbella, Spain. Though it’s unlikely he’s attending for any official business, the photos and video are sure to spark discussion nonetheless.

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Bloomberg: Apple unveiling video service at star-studded March 25th event

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:59

Bloomberg reports today that Apple will unveil its streaming video service at its rumored March 25th event. BuzzFeed News first reported the March 25th date yesterday in the context of Apple’s news subscription service, but it was unclear if the video service would also be included at the event.

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Categories: Geek

Left To Their Own Devices, Pricing Algorithms Resort To Collusion

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:48
Reader schwit1 shares a report: When you're browsing online, who sets the prices? An algorithm, most likely. A study from 2015 showed that a third of all items on Amazon [PDF] had prices set by an algorithm, and chances are that percentage has only risen. A new study shows how easy it would be for price-setting algorithms to learn to collude with each other and keep prices at a disadvantage for customers. This sort of collusion would stem from a certain type of algorithm, the researchers say. Reinforcement algorithms learn through trial and error. In the simplest terms, a walking robot would take a step, fall, and try again. These algorithms have often been used to teach algorithms to win games like Go. "From the antitrust standpoint," say professors Emilio Calvano, Giacomo Calzolari, and others from the University of Bologna in Italy, "the concern is that these autonomous pricing algorithms may independently discover that if they are to make the highest possible profit, they should avoid price wars. That is, they may learn to collude even if they have not been specifically instructed to do so, and even if they do not communicate with one another."

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Would you trade in your iPhone for a $550 credit toward Samsung’s upcoming Galaxy S10?

iDownloadBlog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:31

Samsung really wants you to switch to one of the upcoming Galaxy S10 models: a full week ahead of its presser, the company is offering up to $550 off if you swap your iPhone.
Categories: Geek

Google Voice for iOS rolling out Material Theme redesign

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:21

Late last month, Google Voice for Android was updated with the Google Material Theme. The revamp is now rolling out to iOS with many of the latest design stylings.

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Everything we know so far about the subscription Apple News service [Poll]

9to5Mac - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:20

More details about the rumored new Apple News service are starting to surface including how much it might cost per month and how much publishers could earn. There’s even an Apple event date rumored for when we should expect to see it announced. Here’s what we know so far about the Apple News service:

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Most Online 'Terms of Service' Are Incomprehensible To Adults, Study Finds

Slashdot - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 15:09
Two law professors analyzed the sign-in terms and conditions of 500 popular US websites, including Google and Facebook, and found that more than 99 percent of them were "unreadable," far exceeding the level most American adults read at, but are still enforced. From a report: According to a new paper published on SSRN (Social Science Research Network), the average readability level of the agreements reviewed by the researchers was comparable to articles in academic journals. "While consumers are legally expected or presumed to read their contracts, businesses are not required to write readable ones. This asymmetry -- and its potential consequences -- puzzled us," wrote co-author Samuel Becher, a law professor at Victoria University of Wellington, in an email to Motherboard.

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Apple’s video-streaming service is coming in April or May but without Netflix, Hulu & HBO

iDownloadBlog - Wed, 02/13/2019 - 14:56

Apple is said to be targeting mid-April or early-May to debut a new video-streaming service that will include original content and videos from other digital media services.
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